Maryland Charitable Planning Attorneys Ensure Your Gifts are Maximized and Taxes are Minimized

Leaving a legacy is important

Many individuals are blessed with the ability, foresight, and compassion to make a charitable cause a part of their estate plan. Though many people provide gifts to their favorite cause, organization, or institution during their lifetime, these gifts are often limited due to an individual’s financial obligations during their lifetime. Making a gift after your death provides an opportunity to make a substantial contribution to something important to you. The Maryland charitable planning attorneys at Altman & Associates help many clients throughout Maryland establish estate plans with a focus on philanthropy.

How do I include a charitable gift in my will or trust?

If you have started the estate planning process, then you probably have a will or trust already drafted. If not, there are innumerable reasons to draft these essential estate planning documents. It is easy to make charitable gifts through wills and trusts. If you include language in your will or trust which directs your Personal Representative or Trustee to make a charitable gift, then they must do so – assuming the necessary assets are available. Though the process is straightforward, you should consider your overall estate plan in the context of any charitable gift.

First, remember that surviving spouses are entitled to, at the very least, a surviving spouse share. Second, consider how the gift is deducted from your estate in relation to other gifts or bequests. If you want to provide a particular asset or a set amount of money to a charitable organization, should your estate make that gift first? Should the gift be made after other gifts or bequests are made, or should the residual or remainder of your estate go to the charitable organization? Remember, a probate court will take out certain fees and ensure a surviving spouse is taken care of. After that, an estate generally pays gifts in the order in which they are listed. If your charitable gift is the last gift to be paid and no assets are left in the estate, then your estate cannot make the charitable gift.

Protecting your gift with a Charitable Remainder Trust or Charitable Lead Trust

Leaving a legacy is important, but so is the peace of mind that your legacy represents your wishes long after you are gone. Many individuals want to make charitable gifts as part of their estate plan, but want to make sure that the gift is lasting or supports specific charitable activities. A Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT) allows you to place valuable assets, many time an income-producing asset into trust for a period of time or for your life or the life of someone you choose. It allows you or someone you choose to receive an income stream for life or a period of time. The CRT assets can then pass to the benefitted charity at the end of a specific period. Similarly, a Charitable Lead Trust (CLT) can make distributions to a charity, and then ultimately pass the assets to your heirs. But in either case, when you create your CRT or CLT, you can establish terms and conditions, such as:

  • The term, frequency, and amount of distributions.
  • How the distributed assets are to be used.
  • When and how the assets will transfer from the trust to another entity.
  • The scenarios under which the assets might revert to the trust or the Testator’s heirs.

The Maryland charitable planning attorneys at Altman & Associates are highly-experienced in creating efficient, impactful charitable trusts which reflect your wishes.

Establishing a charitable foundation

You don’t need to be a famous billionaire to establish your own charitable foundation. Instead, you need vision, assets, and proper planning to form a foundation that will make a difference. Notable Maryland charitable planning attorney, Gary Altman, of Altman & Associates is a member of Exponent Philanthropy (formerly the Association of Small Foundations) – a group which understands individuals or small groups can “give big by staying small.” As is the case with any organization, it is important to engage in the necessary due diligence to ensure that the mission of the organization is properly pursued. For a charitable foundation this means:

  • Drafting the necessary documents.
  • Properly operating the organization.
  • Achieving and maintaining non-profit status.
  • Managing the finances of the foundation.

All of these activities must be done in accordance with both state and federal law. Indeed, even starting a charitable foundation in Maryland requires going through processes with the State of Maryland and the Internal Revenue Service. The Maryland charitable planning Attorneys at Altman & Associates are familiar with these processes, and can counsel you on the legal compliance aspects of your charitable foundation.

Contact our knowledgeable Maryland charitable planning attorneys today for sound guidance

Having the compassion and thoughtfulness to consider charitable contributions as part of your estate plan is commendable. The Maryland charitable planning attorneys at Altman & Associates share your sense of compassion and work closely with you to address your individualized charitable giving goals, ensuring your gift is maximized and taxes are minimized. We have convenient office locations in Columbia and Rockville. Contact us by phone at (301) 468-3220 or online to schedule a consultation.


Altman & Associates is a member of the Association of Small Foundations.
For more information, visit their web site.

Share this page!